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Monthly Archives: March 2014

Monroe Edwards was a confidence man who smuggled slaves between Africa, Brazil, Cuba, and Texas. He died in prison in 1847. One of the most famous criminals of his time, Edwards provided literary inspiration for Herman Melville. The Life and Adventures, published in 1848, is the most elaborate of several contemporary biographies. The full text is available here.

Source: American Antiquarian Society (Worcester, MA)

This monthly journal was published by the National American Woman Suffrage Association in Philadelphia beginning in 1896. Resembling a political brochure more than a periodical, its pithy articles focused on women’s equality, especially the right to vote in local and national elections. Prominent feminists, such as May Wright Sewall and Ida Husted Harper, served as featured authors. Scattered issues from April 1896 through August 1898 are available here.

Source: David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University (Durham, NC)

In a previous post, we provided issues of the Daily Worker from August 1924 through December 1925. This post reaches back to some of the paper’s antecedents and earliest issues, covering January 1919 through July 1924. The quality of the microfilm is extremely poor, especially for the early years, with large portions that are illegible. But it is better than nothing. Higher resolution scans of some of these issues and other related newspapers are available here.

Issues of the Ohio Socialist, the Toiler, and the Worker from January 1919 through December 1922 are available here.

Issues of the Worker and the Daily Worker from January 1923 through January 1924 are available here.

Issues of the Daily Worker from February through May 1924 are available here.

Issues of the Daily Worker from June through July 1924 are available here.

Source: Graphic Microfilm Service Inc. (New York, NY)

Published between 1883 and 1907 in Kansas and Illinois, Lucifer was a premier resource for radical feminist and anarchist thought. Topics included atheism, free love, sexuality, and women’s rights. The journal was censored under the Comstock Law of 1873 and its editor, Moses Harman, was imprisoned. Scattered issues published between 1885 and 1903 are available here. Full issues from January 1897 through June 1907 are available here.

Source: David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University (Durham, NC)

Born into slavery in Maryland, Daniel Coker was a pioneering missionary involved in the earliest expeditions of the American Colonization Society and the foundation of the modern state of Liberia. His first expedition is chronicled in the Journal of Daniel Coker, published in Baltimore in 1820. A copy of that book is available here. Coker’s manuscript diary, held by the Library of Congress, records daily events at Fourah Bay, Sierra Leone, between April 21 and September 21, 1821. A complete copy is now available here.

Source: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service (microfilm)